ELECTIVES

Elective classes at The Oberle School are designed to reveal skill sets of students that might not be obvious in their other classes. These courses help students discover strengths and interests outside of academia and afford them opportunities to find success in an elective course that may lead a career path.

Some of our elective offerings include:

 

 

Anatomy and Physiology

Art   

Auto Detailing

Bike Repair

Building Trades

Carpentry

Computer Programming

Cooking

Creative Writing

Culinary Arts

Cybersecurity Essentials

Design Multi-Media Web

Education for Employment

Entrepreneurship

Foreign Language

General Music

Guitar

Health Assisting Careers

Imaging Technology

Independent Living

Health and Medical Sciences

Life Planning

Oceanography

Photojournalism

Psychology

Small Engine Repair

Social Development

Culinary Arts

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Small Engine Repair

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Middle School Carpentry Exploratory!

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Culinary Arts

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CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

The goal of our Career and Technical Education program is to teach students the skills demanded in the labor market that provide clear pathways leading to industry certifications, post-secondary certificates and degrees. The addition of our CTE program has been successful in motivating reluctant students to attend school more frequently and be more engaged in their core academic classes. Many of our CTE students also participate in our Education for Employment program and obtain training sites in the community related to their CTE training. This training and experience often leads to competitive employment in the community. All students are required to pass OSHA training. 

 
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EDUCATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Our Education for Employment (EFE) program allows students to learn about the world of work in the classroom setting and gain real-life work experience in a variety of businesses in the Fredericksburg area. Students work directly with an Oberle transition support staff to determine their interests and abilities, explore career paths, job shadow and eventually find a training site in the community where they work during the school day. Students receive a training stipend for this program of up to $80 per week. Research has found that work-based learning helps students apply and extend classroom learning, gain motivation and understanding, explore careers and develop critical understanding of the work environment.